Tuesday, April 10, 2012

painted ruin

It took twelve hours to drive home from Kingston yesterday. We had a lovely family visit with two kids, their partners, my father). I was also able to see my sister who lives nearby. The visit with my aging father seemed more emotional this time and once back in the studio today, I fell into my art as a kind of therapy. I may have ruined monumental simplicity. It's really hard to stay cool and minimalist. The paint did become lighter once it dried, and I am now in the process of removing months of red thread. The idea is to show absence.

24 comments:

  1. Not ruined! In my eyes, just beautiful! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. What an undertaking, but a worthy one, indeed!

    ReplyDelete
  3. All my overtired brain is capable of thinking at the moment is Wow! That's got to be magnificent!

    ReplyDelete
  4. amazed with my mouth hanging open, waiting...

    ReplyDelete
  5. One woman's ruin is another woman's treasure. Why be cool when emotions are hot. like blood and water, the two coexist. I look forward to the further developments on this wonderful piece.

    ReplyDelete
  6. when we can remove such descriptive labels from our own work, we will realize what genius resided therein all the time! the absence is most assuredly there. blissfully, beautifully, amazingly there! the thought to actually *remove* months' worth of thread chanting to express absence is inspirational!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Judy, you are so brave!

    ReplyDelete
  8. No, you didn't ruin it. It's beautiful, Judy. Absence is as real as presence.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Simplicity isn't always easy, but the results are worth it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. on a painting of mine I had all these stitches I had first painted around and then over and then I decided the stitches had to be removed and the result was great, negative amoebe-like shapes, very rewarding and better than I could have 'positively'done; cannot see your whole piece in the photo's but I imagine the result must be good! and what you do show is good! I like the concept of having made the effort and then being ruthless and undoing it all....a bit like those sand-mandala's, all that we humans undertake is after all futile ( and I mean that in the best possible way)

    ReplyDelete
  11. the sound and feeling of the thread being pulled from the cloth.

    ReplyDelete
  12. i'm quite breathless.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anonymous4:24 pm

    yeah. you've done well here.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I KNOW you did not ruin this. It is just asking to be considered differently......we are never in control.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Judy - the cloth is such a remarkable piece...the red connotes so much, it's life and death, presence and absence. i saw an interview with robert rauschenberg not too long ago and he said that the color red for him was also the most challenging to work with. he said it could easily turn to black. interesting that. your mention of your father is mindful of my father - it's not easy to use the word frail. take care.
    a link to the interview fyi,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=vVfsjJniFrs

    ReplyDelete
  16. This work is beautiful. I am currently experimenting with similar processes on fabric in my painting classes, although not with as many hours of stitching involved. Your bravery is very inspiring...

    ReplyDelete
  17. The trails of absent stitches is brilliant Judy.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I can't see the ruin, neither.

    These pigment ¿jars? are wonderfull.

    ReplyDelete
  19. 'the idea is to show absence' ....and you have.

    poignant post.

    Jacky xox

    ReplyDelete
  20. Anonymous11:04 am

    I have been lurking on your blog for ages and seeing what you are doing today, I can't stay in the shadows any longer. Judy I reallly admire your work. You are a trye artist! Thanks for sharing so much on your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  21. sorry to offend any ladies, but can i just say, fuck ya mom! i am so impressed with your ingenuity and bravery! when i see ruin in the title, i think of a grecian or ancient ruin. this thing is everlasting.

    feeling full of your love,
    xo

    ReplyDelete
  22. April, thank you for your love.

    Next time, try "wow" as a compliment.

    xx

    ReplyDelete
  23. not ruined at all, it has a patina now.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to connect. Much appreciated.xx